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    This rare pair of armchairs was designed by Rolf Engströmer for the Maria Husmodersskola in Stockholm, circa 1946. The round lines, the slanted seat and the curved, tapered sycamore legs give the design a gracious appearance.

    The chairs have been fully reconditioned and newly upholstered in a pearl bouclé fabric by Métaphores. The fabric is called ‘Mies’ and blends linen, viscose and wool into a warm and beautiful texture.

    Rolf Engströmer (1892-1970) was a Swedish architect, interior designer and furniture designer. He worked for some of the most renowned Swedish designers including Gunnar Asplund and Carl Bergsten, before starting his own furniture and furnishing company ‘“Jefta” in the 1930s. Some of his best known works include the interior of the Rigoletto Cinema in Stockholm and the iconic circular entrance hall of Eltham Palace in Greenwich, London. He was an important representative of the Swedish Grace style.

    Together with the textile designer Astrid Sampe and the artist Dagmar Lodén, Engströmer was responsible for designing the new premises of the Maria Husmodersskola in the mid-1940s. Pictures of the interior were showcased in the monthly periodical Svenska Hem, which showcased the homes of Swedish socialites, together with occasional reports from exhibitions and interiors from public buildings. The February 1947 issue, was called “YK-nummer”, (YK being short for Yrkeskvinnor or ‘Working Women’ in English) and featured an extensive article on the school, emphasizing the day to day routines and seminars offered to female students.

    Literature: Svenska Hem, Gunvor Björkman, ‘Hem i Skola’, February 1947, page 45-47.