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    This rare side/occasional table was designed by P.E.L. Izeren and produced by the Dutch company Genneper Molen in 1930. The frame and top are made of solid and veneered oak, with the eight supporting column slats and the rectangular feet in solid macassar ebony wood. The oak top veneered in a square marquetry manner, with contrasting lines in veneered macassar, The geometric, tiered base and the beautiful warm wood grains give the table a refined and modern appearance.

    The details, materials and nearly modernist appearance of the design are exemplary for the Haagse School style. This style was not so much inspired by the Classic European Art Deco capitals such as Paris and Vienna but more by other national and international architectural developments such as the work of Frank Lloyd Wright. The influential magazine Wendingen published a series of articles on Wright still relatively unknown at the time in 1925 and the renowned architect Jan Wils also played an important role in the orientation towards Wrights work in The Netherlands. In its particular application of geometric shapes, primary colors and its sophisticated cubist division of the surface, the Haagse School designers were also aware of De Stijl movement, led by contemporaries such as Gerrit Rietveld and Piet Mondriaan.